The Stories We Save May Include Our Own

Content warning: this article contains references to suicide, death and depression. An earlier version of this essay originally appeared in Iron City Magazine.  photo credit for the featured image: Alvin Shim by Matt Malyon I. BirdwatchingLate night on Watson Bridge—a span across the Skagit River in Northern Washington—a trumpeter swan flies into a light pole….

Building a Queer Canon

the featured image is from electricliterature.com by Annabel Paulsen “[Queerness] is not something to be ashamed of, and I’m coming from a place of privilege because I was not ashamed. I want [my students] to feel the same freedom, and that’s why in my teaching, in my writing, in the artists I have picked for…

Writing Our Names

by Madison Stuart Teachers are keepers of names. Some corner of my brain is cluttered with Alexanders and Amanis and Keanus and Kylies. That first day of school, working down the roster, teachers wield a great appellative power; how many Pomaikaimaikekukunaokalamekahos who go by Po, Zhijias who go by Roy, Shar’lynnruths who go by Shari?…

Life, Death, and Twine

Writer Suzy Rigdon shares how using technology as part of storytelling “presents a radical shift in thinking about how language can tell a story.” Students use a program called Twine and find new possibilities to writing non-linear or multi-linear pieces.

Season of Virus: Poems Written During the Pandemic

The following poems were written during our year in quarantine, from 2020-2021, by older adults in virtual creating aging programs through Teachers & Writers Collaborative and our partners. The first set is from participants in the oral history and storytelling program with Visions Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired, a workshop led by Dave Johnson…

Teachers & Writers Magazine

Teachers & Writers Collaborative: www.twc.org

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